NCRefs
Logon
NCRefs Info
GoodStuff
*FIFA Laws
*USSF Docs.
*League Rules
*Misconduct
*Ref. Articles
*Questions?
*Registration
*Upgrade
*Ref. Uniform
*Links
*Videos/Books
Calendar
Fields
Evaluation
MatchResults

Ref. Uniform

LogonidleidleidlefindGoto

REFEREE UNIFORM SOURCES


Approved by the National Board of Directors 5/15/99

In accordance with USSF Rule 531, the Referee Committee, at the April 10, 1999 meeting, recommended that the National Board of Directors approve the following uniform standards for United States Soccer Federation referees, effective immediately:

Red, Yellow and Black Uniforms

Official United States Soccer Federation Referee Uniform (GOLD)

  • Gold jersey with black pin stripes, black collar, black cuffs (long sleeve), or no cuff (short sleeve)
  • Black shorts
  • Black socks with three stripe white top
  • Black shoes

Official Alternate United States Soccer Federation Referee Uniform (BLACK, RED, or BLUE added June 2002)

Alternate Blue
  • Black (white pin stripes) or Red (black pinstripes) or Blue (black pinstripes) jersey, black collar, black cuffs (long sleeve) or no cuffs (short sleeve).
  • Black shorts
  • Black socks with three stripe white top
  • Black shoes

The referee committee noted that the current uniform, black shirt with white collar and cuffs, and the current alternate uniform, fuchsia shirt with white collar and black or white cuffs, can be worn through January 1, 2002, allowing the referees two and one half years to accommodate to the change.


REF. UNIFORMS - USSF GUIDELINES

Excerpts from the U.S. Soccer Fair Play newsletter, Fall 1999, Volume 9 - Issue 2.

Q. What guidance can you give me on the referee uniform and what referees are allowed to wear?
A. Here is the policy of the U.S. Soccer Federation National Referee Program:
  • The primary uniform is now the gold jersey.
  • The new alternate jerseys (red with black stripes or black with white stripes) may be worn as they become available.
  • No other colors will be worn except by authority of the USSF.
  • The uniform colors worn by a goalkeeper and the referee or by a team (or both teams) and the referee may be similar enough to invite confusion. If so, the referee should attempt to have the goalkeeper or the team(s) change to different colors. If there is no way to resolve the color similarity, then the referee (and the assistant referees) must use common sense and wear the colors that conflict least with the players.
  • Referees and the assistant referees must wear the same color jerseys, and all must wear the same length sleeve.
  • Referees may wear a hat, cap, or other head covering, if necessary for religious or medical reasons.
  • Referees must wear the badge of the current registration year. If a referee has only recently purchased a new black or fuchsia jersey, there is no need to rush out and buy a new uniform immediately; however, if the referee's uniform is not in the best condition and he or she is contemplating buying a new one anyway, then the new gold jersey would be the best choice. The current uniforms may be worn until January 1, 2002, so there is plenty of time to buy the new jerseys without an immediate great outlay of money.
Q. What should be done if the referee and one of the assistant referees wear the gold shirt, but the other assistant comes to the field in the black shirt?
A. Every effort must be made to have all three referees in uniforms of the same color and design. If only two of them have the gold shirt, but all three have the black uniform, then black should be worn, provided there is no color conflict with one of the teams. Common sense should be used in those situations where there is a conflict with team colors.
Q. Must the gold, red, and black have the U.S. Soccer Federation logo on the sleeve?
A. No, the gold, red, and black shirts with the U.S. Soccer Federation logo on the sleeves are the official shirts of the Federation; however, a shirt identical in design and colors without the logo on the sleeve is acceptable.
Q. May referees wear caps and sunglasses?
A. With regard to caps, the policy of the United States Soccer Federation was stated in the Spring 1994 issue of Fair Play magazine: "Under normal circumstances, it is not acceptable for a game official to wear headgear, and it would never be seen on a high level regional, national or international competition. However, there may be rare circumstances in local competitions where head protection or sun visors might sensibly be tolerated for the good of the game, e.g. early morning or late afternoon games with sun in the officials' line of sight causing vision difficulties; understaffed situations where an official with sensitive skin might be pressed into service for multiple games under strong sunlight or a referee who wears glasses needing shielding from rain." Sunglasses would be subject to the same considerations. In addition, we ask referees to remember that sunglasses have the unfortunate side effect of suggesting that the referee or assistant referee is severely visually impaired and should not be working the game. They also limit communication between the officials and the players by providing a barrier against eye-to-eye contact. Sunglasses, if worn, should be removed prior to any verbal communication with players.
Q. I recently had a knee injury, and currently wear a rubberized knee brace for support and prevention. The brace is black, soft, with velcro closure. What are the rules regarding referees wearing such devices?
A. Knee braces are not part of the authorized referee uniform. Under normal circumstances, it is not acceptable for a game official to wear a knee brace, and it would never be seen on a high-level regional, national or international competition. However, there may be rare circumstances in local competitions where knee protection might sensibly be tolerated for the good of the game.

Copyright © 2018 by North Chapter Soccer Referees Association/webmaster@ncrefs.org
RidgeStar